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Web Design by Designers : Comments

By Kimberly Elam

August 26, 2008

Comments

MiSc

August 27, 2008 4:04 AM

HiRes! (www.hi-res.net) however re-invented the animated gif.

Mark

August 27, 2008 10:23 AM

Principal/Principle:
http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/principal.html

Matthew Pennell

August 27, 2008 11:00 AM

@Mark

Puns and word play:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Word_play

Did you read the following paragraph?

;)

Mayor of Kentonville

August 27, 2008 11:18 PM

Thank you for the article, very interesting

trunkmonkey

August 29, 2008 1:59 PM

I wish you would have had a larger selection of websites for examples. The approaches are more similar than not. Did you come from an established print background? The grid screams over everything, and while a great way to utilize hierarchy, it was established in print for a reason: the grid is fixed. The web allows for fluidity and interactivity that can be both novel and clear. These are great sites, don’t get me wrong, but it looks like the articles focus is viewed through the print lens. Now that I’ve been ‘fussy’, I still have to say it was a good article!

Bengo

September 2, 2008 5:42 PM

Outstanding concept and execution on this article. Stopped me dead mid-surf and in a hurry to wrap up.

Bengo
Webcomic artist, lilnyet.com

Marcello

September 3, 2008 9:27 AM

Excellent article, lots of great examples of great visual design. But I also agree with trunkmonkey: the web is not print, and it’s important that designers understand this. The web is expected to be flexible and adapt to a wide variety of environments. What looks elegant on your 1024×780 screen might seem awfully cumbersome on the screen of an iPhone. And users increasingly expect websites to be interactive and customizable, which means that the designer must be willing to relinquish control of the final product.

The websites in the article are excellent examples of well-designed portfolio sites, and many of the principles they adhere to may translate to other sites. But great graphic design is not necessarily great web design. So be careful!

Marc Van Rymenant

September 5, 2008 3:57 PM

Cool article… Something to complete it : the analysis of eye tracking data gathered during hundreds of missions has allowed us to determine a key behaviour to be taken into account when designing a site: the top zone of an interface is very little noticed and/or only later on during the visit of the website. Take a look at http://www.simplifyinginterfaces.com/2008/08/netway-interface-comfort-zone/

Have a nice week…

Marc

Gill

September 6, 2008 4:15 AM

The article hit the sweet spot which I feel is important to any web design – regardless if its for a design agency or not – is that the website must age well and target all audiences. It is a lot harder than you think – and sometimes i feel that it is justifiable to bring print designs over to the web – the swiss style is a prime example that works well online and not only on print – and has aged very well. http://www.aisleone.net/ is a great introduction to the style and also the following flickr set:http://www.flickr.com/groups/intertypostyle/pool/

Gill
Nottingham Web Design (www.gillandco.com)

Brandon Cox

September 10, 2008 9:19 AM

One thing I appreciate about these designers is they seem to rise above the crowd a bit. You never see an overuse of anything trendy. This article inspired some tweaks to my own design site. Thanks!

Leonard N

November 29, 2008 1:25 AM

These sites are an example on the coding side of how not to be semantic. Which is not surprising since a lot of these so called great clients of theirs don’t give a flying teapot about ethics and thoughtfulness.

Sorry, comments are closed.

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